Jun 5, 2008

Keloid


A keloid is a type of scar which results in an overgrowth of tissue at the site of a healed skin injury. Keloids are firm, rubbery lesions or shiny, fibrous nodules, and can vary from pink to flesh-colored or red to dark brown in color. A keloid scar is benign, non-contagious, and usually accompanied by severe itchiness, sharp pains, and changes in texture. In severe cases, it can affect movement of skin. Keloids should not be confused with hypertrophic scars, which are raised scars that do not grow beyond the boundaries of the original wound and may reduce over time.

Keloids are mostly found on earlobes, the sternum, shoulders, the upper back and any place where abrasion has occurred. These are usually the result of pimples, insect bites, scratching, burns, or other skin trauma. Certain procedures are known to cause keloid formation such as within post-operative surgical scars or on earlobes following piercing and behind the ears after otoplasty

People of all ages can develop a keloid. Children under 11 are less likely to develop keloids, even when they get their ears pierced. Keloids may also develop from pseudofoliculitis barbae, continued shaving when one has razor bumps will cause irritation to the bumps, infection and over time keloids will form. It would thus be wise for a man with razor bumps to stop shaving for a while and have the skin repair itself first before undertaking any form of hair removal.

No treatment for keloids is considered to be 100% effective. Some of the treatments that are currently available are described below. These treatments have varying degrees of effectiveness. All the invasive methods of treatment like surgery carry a serious risk of the keloid recurring and becoming bigger than it previously was.

  • Tea Tree Oil.
  • Crushed Aspirin Paste.
  • Surgery — Surgery requires great care during and after the operation. Keloids that return after being excised may be larger than the original. There is a 50% chance of recurrence after surgical removal. However, keloids are less likely to return if surgical removal is combined with other treatments. Surgical or laser excision may be followed by intralesional injections of a corticosteroid. Plastic closure of the skin including techniques such as v-plasty or w-plasty to reduce skin tension are known to reduce recurrence of keloids following excision.
  • Dressings
  • Steroid injections — Steroid injections are best used as the scar begins to thicken or if the person is a known keloid former. A series of injections with triamcinolone acetonide or another corticosteroid may reduce keloid size and irritation. However, injections are often uncomfortable and in large and/or hard scars can be difficult to perform, requiring local anesthetic for people over 16, and full anesthetic for people under. The treatment area can become very painful as the anesthetic wears off.
  • Compression — Compression bandages applied to the site over several months, sometimes for as long as six to twelve months, may lead to a reduction in the size of the keloid. This is the best treatment for preventing new scars.
  • Cryosurgery

click for more :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keloid